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Diet & Nutrition NIDDK

Details: Food and beverages provide the energy and nutrients you need to improve health, manage disease, and reduce the risk of disease. Find resources on nutrition to help you pay attention to what, when, how often, why, and how much you eat and drink, as well …

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Treatment for Food Poisoning NIDDK

Details: Food recalls. You can help prevent food poisoning by watching for food recalls. Companies recall foods—take foods off the market—if they find out that the foods could make people sick. If you learn that a food was recalled because it could cause food poisoning, check to see if you have the food. If you do, make sure no one eats it.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Food Poisoning NIDDK

Details: When you have food poisoning, you should drink plenty of liquids to replace lost fluids and electrolytes. You may vomit after you eat or lose your appetite for a short time. When your appetite returns, you can most often go back to eating your normal diet, even if you still have diarrhea.

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Symptoms & Causes of Food Poisoning NIDDK

Details: Food poisoning can become dangerous if it leads to severe dehydration or other complications. The symptoms listed below may suggest that an adult or child has a severe form of food poisoning, dehydration or other complications, or a serious health problem other than food poisoning. Anyone with these signs or symptoms should see a doctor right away.

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Definition & Facts of Food Poisoning NIDDK

Details: Food poisoning, also called foodborne illness, is an infection or irritation of your digestive tract that spreads through food or drinks. Viruses, bacteria, and parasites cause most food poisoning. Harmful chemicals may also cause food poisoning. Food poisoning is most often acute, meaning it happens suddenly and lasts a short time.

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Eating & Nutrition for Hemodialysis NIDDK

Details: Make a food plan that reduces the potassium in your diet. Start by noting the high-potassium foods you currently eat. Your renal dietitian can help you add foods to the list. Changes. Talk with your renal dietitian about foods you can eat instead of high-potassium foods.

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Your Digestive System & How it Works NIDDK

Details: The movement pushes food and liquid through your GI tract and mixes the contents within each organ. The muscle behind the food contracts and squeezes the food forward, while the muscle in front of the food relaxes to allow the food to move. The digestive process starts when you put food …

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Symptoms & Causes of Dumping Syndrome NIDDK

Details: When food moves too quickly from your stomach to your duodenum, your digestive tract releases more hormones than normal. Fluid also moves from your blood stream into your small intestine. Experts think that the excess hormones and movement of fluid into your small intestine cause the symptoms of early dumping syndrome.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Dumping Syndrome NIDDK

Details: adding pectin or guar gum—plant extracts used as thickening agents—to your food; Last Reviewed January 2019. Share. Previous: Treatment Next: Clinical Trials This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates

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Just Enough for You: About Food Portions NIDDK

Details: The FDA food label is printed on most packaged foods. The food label is a quick way to find the amount of calories and nutrients in a certain amount of food. For example, reading food labels tells you how many calories and how much fat, protein, sodium, and other ingredients are in one food serving. Many packaged foods contain more than a

› Verified 8 days ago

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Irritable Bowel Syndrome NIDDK

Details: This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Diverticular Disease NIDDK

Details: Grains; Food and Portion Size Amount of Fiber; 1 ⁄ 3-3 ⁄ 4 cup high-fiber bran ready-to-eat cereal: 9.1–14.3 grams: 1-1 1 ⁄ 4 cup of shredded wheat ready-to-eat cereal: 5.0–9.0 grams: 1 1 ⁄ 2 cup whole wheat spaghetti, cooked: 3.2 grams: 1 small oat bran muffin: 3.0 grams

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Gastritis & Gastropathy NIDDK

Details: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis can cause problems absorbing iron from food, leading to iron-deficiency anemia. Treating the H. pylori infection and taking iron supplements can improve the anemia. Autoimmune gastritis can cause problems absorbing iron and vitamin B12 from food, which may lead to iron-deficiency anemia and pernicious

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Gastroparesis NIDDK

Details: How can my diet help prevent or relieve gastroparesis? What you eat can help prevent or relieve your gastroparesis symptoms.If you have diabetes, following a healthy meal plan can help you manage your blood glucose levels.What you eat can also help make sure you get the right amount of nutrients, calories, and liquids if you are malnourished or dehydrated from gastroparesis.

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Dumping Syndrome NIDDK

Details: Dumping syndrome is a group of symptoms, such as diarrhea, nausea, and feeling light-headed or tired after a meal, that are caused by rapid gastric emptying. Rapid gastric emptying is a condition in which food moves too quickly from your stomach to your duodenum.

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Eating & Nutrition for Peritoneal Dialysis NIDDK

Details: Food makers often add phosphorus to processed and packaged foods, such as lunch meats. You should avoid these foods. Poultry, fish, nuts, peanut butter, dried beans, cola, tea, and dairy products are high in phosphorus. Take phosphorus binders with your meals and snacks.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Celiac Disease NIDDK

Details: Many food ingredients and additives—such as colorings, flavorings, starches, and thickeners—are made from grains that contain gluten. These ingredients are added to many processed foods, including foods that are boxed, canned, frozen, packaged, or prepared.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Hemorrhoids NIDDK

Details: Food and Portion Size Amount of Fiber; Grains; ⅓‒¾ cup high-fiber bran, ready-to-eat cereal: 9.1–14.3 grams: 1‒1¼ cups of shredded wheat, ready-to-eat cereal: 5.0–9.0 grams: 1½ cups whole-wheat spaghetti, cooked: 3.2 grams: 1 small oat bran muffin: 3.0 grams: Fruits; 1 medium pear, with skin: 5.5 grams: 1 medium apple, with skin: 4

› Verified 7 days ago

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Viral Gastroenteritis

Details: For some people, certain food ingredients may make symptoms such as diarrhea worse, including. drinks with caffeine, such as coffee and tea, and some soft drinks. foods that are high in fat, such as fried foods, pizza, and fast foods. foods and drinks containing large amounts of simple sugars, such as sweetened beverages and some fruit juices.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Colon Polyps NIDDK

Details: This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public.

› Verified 8 days ago

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Proctitis NIDDK

Details: How can my diet help reduce symptoms of proctitis? Depending on the cause of your proctitis, changing your diet can help reduce symptoms. Your doctor may recommend that you eat more foods that are high in fiber.Eating foods that are high in fiber can make stools softer and easier to pass and can help prevent constipation.A doctor or dietitian can help you learn how to add more high-fiber foods

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Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity NIDDK

Details: The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables. nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Constipation in Children NIDDK

Details: fast food; meat; prepared foods, such as some frozen meals and snack foods; processed foods, such as hot dogs or some microwavable dinners; References [2] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015-2020 (PDF, 10.3 MB) . 8th ed. Published December 2015. Accessed May 1

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Gallstones NIDDK

Details: This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Gas in the Digestive Tract

Details: You may be able to reduce gas by avoiding or eating less of the foods that give you gas. You can keep a food diary to help figure out which foods give you gas and how much of the gas-producing foods you can handle. You may try avoiding or limiting. carbonated, or fizzy, drinks; fried and high-fat foods

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Primary Biliary Cholangitis

Details: What should I eat if I have primary biliary cholangitis? You should eat a healthy, well-balanced diet.Good nutrition is important in all stages of primary biliary cholangitis to help your liver work properly and manage complications.. Your doctor can recommend a healthy eating plan that is well-balanced and provides enough calories and nutrients. Your doctor may recommend that you eat foods

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for NAFLD & NASH NIDDK

Details: How can my diet help prevent or treat NAFLD and NASH? If you don’t have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), you may be able to prevent these conditions by eating a healthy diet, limiting your portion sizes, and maintaining a healthy weight.. If you have NAFLD or NASH, your doctor may recommend gradually losing weight if you are overweight or obese.

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Keep Active and Eat Healthy to Improve Well-being and Feel

Details: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Nutrition Facts label appears on most packaged foods and tells you how many calories and servings are in a box, can, or package. The label also shows how many nutrients are in one food serving. The FDA made changes in 2016 to update the Nutrition Facts label. How can I handle roadblocks to healthy eating?

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Lactose Intolerance NIDDK

Details: How should I change my diet if I have lactose intolerance? Talk with your doctor or a dietitian about changing your diet to manage lactose intolerance symptoms while making sure you get enough nutrients. If your child has lactose intolerance, help your child follow the dietary plan recommended by a doctor or dietitian.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Kidney Stones NIDDK

Details: Talk with a health care professional about other food sources of oxalate and how much oxalate should be in what you eat. Reduce sodium. Your chance of developing kidney stones increases when you eat more sodium. Sodium is a part of salt. Sodium is in many canned, packaged, and fast foods. It is also in many condiments, seasonings, and meats.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Kidney Stones in Children

Details: A health care provider can explain other food sources of oxalate and how much oxalate is safe to eat. Reduce sodium. The chances of developing kidney stones increase when children eat more sodium. Sodium is a part of salt. Sodium is in many canned, packaged, and fast foods. It is also in many condiments, seasonings, and meats.

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Health Tips for Adults NIDDK

Details: Food and beverages high in fat, added sugar, and calories are easy to find and sometimes hard to avoid. And they often cost less than healthier choices like fruits and vegetables. On top of that, smartphones and other devices may make it easy for you to be less active in your daily routine.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Fecal Incontinence NIDDK

Details: Keeping a food diary. Your doctor or dietitian may recommend keeping a food diary, which can help you find out which foods and drinks make your symptoms better or worse. After a few days, the diary may show a link between certain foods and drinks and your fecal incontinence.

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Food Insecurity and HIV NIDDK

Details: Food insecurity is a complex problem that intersects with other social determinants of health. PWH with food insecurity face multiple challenges to ART adherence and to staying in care for comborbidities, coinfections, and disease complications, so they have poorer outcomes.

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Nutrition for Children with Chronic Kidney Disease NIDDK

Details: Food provides energy your child needs to grow and be active. Children with CKD tend to avoid eating because they don’t feel hungry. Talk with your child’s kidney specialist or dietitian to make sure your child is getting enough calories for proper growth and to fight infections.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Interstitial Cystitis NIDDK

Details: Keep a food diary and note the times you have bladder pain. For example, the diary might show that your symptom flares always happen after you eat tomatoes or oranges. If you find that certain foods make your symptoms worse, your health care professional and …

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Ulcerative Colitis NIDDK

Details: Your doctor may suggest keeping a food diary to help identify foods that seem to make your symptoms worse. Depending on your symptoms and the medicines you take, your doctor may recommend changes to your diet. Your doctor may also recommend dietary supplements. Last Reviewed September 2020.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Aplastic Anemia

Details: People with low white blood cell counts are at risk for infections and should follow food safety guidelines for people with cancer, which include. fully cook all meat, fish, and egg dishes; avoid fruits and vegetables that you cannot peel; avoid raw foods; avoid unpasteurized cheese, milk, and other dairy products; avoid unpasteurized juices

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Diarrhea NIDDK

Details: This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public.

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Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome NIDDK

Details: This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public.

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Eating & Physical Activity to Lose or Maintain Weight NIDDK

Details: All your food and beverage choices count. Eating healthy is a journey shaped by many factors, including your age, weight, metabolism , food preferences, access to food, culture, and traditions; whether you are a man or woman; and the personal decisions you make over time.

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